Wapato - bag of 10 tubers

wapato2.jpg
leaves.jpg
ridgefield_NWR_wapato_flower_08-11-07.jpg
01010017.jpg
aaa 083.jpg
wapato2.jpg
leaves.jpg
ridgefield_NWR_wapato_flower_08-11-07.jpg
01010017.jpg
aaa 083.jpg

Wapato - bag of 10 tubers

15.00

Sagittaria cuneata is an aquatic plant growing in swampy ground or standing water in ponds, lakes, stream edges, and ditches (Hickman 1993). Wapato have white or bluish tubers, which are edible. The leaves are sagittate, with 5-15 cm long erect or floating leaf blades; the lower lobes of the emergent leaf blades are less than the terminal lobe. The inflorescence is simple or branching, often with the lower flowers pistillate and the upper ones staminate. The flowers are white, with three white petals and 3 sepals. Stamens are numerous and bright yellow. The pistils are numerous, spirally arranged on the receptacle. The fruit is a greenish colored achene.

Water depth should be 0 to 6" and the soils should be wet. Sagittaria grows prolifically around ponds or wetlands in shallow water.

Sagittaria is an aquatic plant with tuberous roots that can be eaten like potatoes. The tubers of Sagittaria species were eaten by many different Indigenous groups in Canada, as well as many groups of Washington and Oregon (Kuhnlein and Turner 1991). The tubers were widely traded from harvesting centers to neighboring areas. On the Lower Columbia in Chinook Territory, Katzie families owned large patches of the wapato plants. Family groups camped beside their harvesting sites for a month or more.

Plant form: tubers

Planting Instructions and more information: USDA NRCS Plant Guide

Quantity:
Add Bundle to Cart